Spread across steep hillsides that overlook the Rio Tejo, Lisbon offers all the delights you’d expect of Portugal’s star attraction, yet with half the fuss of other European capitals. Gothic cathedrals, majestic monasteries and quaint museums are all part of the colorful cityscape, but the real delights of discovery lie in wandering the narrow lanes of Lisbon’s lovely backstreets. 

As bright yellow trams wind their way through curvy tree-lined streets, Lisboetas stroll through the old quarters, much as they’ve done for centuries. Village-life gossip in old Alfama is exchanged at the public baths or over fresh bread and wine at tiny patio restaurants as fadistas (proponents of fado, Portugal’s traditional melancholic singing) perform in the background. 

Lisbon is an illuminated city. The almost constant presence of sunshine and the River Tagus transforms the Portuguese capital into a mirror of a thousand colors - highlighting the city’s unique architecture and beauty.

 

There are so many things to see and do in Lisbon that visitors have access to a wide array of different experiences.

As we walk through Lisbon - whose history spans back thousands of years – we find streets filled with heritage monuments, and characteristic neighborhoods where the city first developed and can still be experienced at its most genuine level.

Visit Lisbon of the River Tagus, whose riverfront is dedicated to leisure activities and links the monumental zone of Belem with the modern area of the Parque das Nações.

 

Have fun in Lisbon, where nightlife continues till dawn. Practice sport in Lisbon - with excellent Golf courses and beaches close at hand.

Experience calmer moments in Lisbon in the city’s parks, gardens, belvederes, cafés and esplanades. 

Or simply enjoy the pure pleasure of being in Lisbon, through its gastronomy, luxury hotels, spas and shopping centers.

Lisbon. A personal experience. 

 

 

About Lisbon

GEOGRAPHICAL SITUATION  
Lisboa is the capital of Portugal and lies on the north bank of the Tagus Estuary, on the European Atlantic coast. It is the westernmost city in continental Europe. Greater Lisboa has an area of approximately 1,000 km2. The city lies more or less in the center of the country, approximately 300 km from the Algarve in the south and 400 km from the northern border with Spain.
Lisboa offers a wide variety of options to the visitor, including beaches, countryside, mountains and areas of historical interest only a few kilometers away from the city center. 

LANGUAGE 
Portuguese is Latin in origin and the third most widely spoken European language in the world. It is the mother tongue of about 200 million people. Portuguese is the official language in several countries: Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, São Tomé e Príncipe in Africa, and Brazil in South America. In Portugal itself a considerable number of people can understand and communicate in foreign languages. 

DEMOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION  
Approximately 600,000 people live in Lisboa. However, if one includes the various satellite towns, the population of Greater Lisboa rises to approximately 1.9 million people.  

RELIGION 
Portuguese culture is greatly influenced by religion. Although Catholicism predominates, other religions may be freely practiced.  

ELECTRICITY  

Voltage: 220/380 volts at a frequency of 50 Hertz. All sockets follow European standards. To use American-type plugs, a 220-volt transformer should be used together with an adapter plug. 

 

 

SCHEDULES  

The visitor has access to all normal services at any time of the day and on all days of the week - not only in
Opening hours in Portugal are similar to those in the rest of Europe.

Cinema showings begin at around lunch-time, and at Pharmacies keep the same opening hours as the rest of the shops but, in order to guarantee 24-hour service, some stay open after 7 p.m. Generally speaking, restaurants are open for lunch from 12 mid-day to 3.p.m and for dinner from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.but also in the rest of the country.Lisboa, Theatres and other shows usually start between 9 p.m. and 10 p.m some cinemas there are sessions until 2a.m.

 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
In terms of telecommunications, Lisboa offers state-of-the-art technology and can supply a large number of phone lines and other communication equipment in the shortest possible time. Portugal Telecom, the Portuguese telecommunications group, operates with a wide range of technological networks for telephone services, data communications, international and satellite connections, mobile communications and cable TV, thus ensuring ease of contact with the rest of the world.  

 

CURRENCY 
The unit of currency in Portugal is the Euro €. 

 

Lisbon the 'coolest' city in Europe.

According to the American television chain CNN, Lisbon is the 'coolest' city in Europe.
It praised the nightlife, as well as the "fascinating streets" of the historic districts. The proximity to fantastic beaches is also identified as a major asset, as is the gastronomy.

Lisbon is the third most hospitable city in the World.

This is the conclusion of a survey by TripAdvisor, the world's largest travel site.
The Portuguese capital has reached the podium in the category of cities whose inhabitants are more obliging and more available to help.

GET TO LISBON

There are many ways to get to Lisbon and all of them are easy to use. With the airport just a few minutes from the centre of the city, stations with international rail links and various ports for cruise ships, there are many options for getting to the capital of Portugal. If you prefer to come by car, there are excellent roads from various points north and south along the border with Spain.

 

AIR

Land at the Lisbon international airport which is just a mere 7 km from the centre of the city. Served by the main international airlines and just 3 hours away from the main European capitals, it is very easy to reach.

 

TRAIN

It is just as easy to reach the centre of the city. National and international trains arrive every day at Santa Apolónia station, which is very close to all the traditional neighbourhoods and Terreiro do Paço. But if you would like to add a unique architectural experience to your arrival, get off at Gare do Oriente, whose Calatrava-designed lines impress even those who see it every day.

 

CAR

The best ways to enter Lisbon are via the A1 and A2, which both have national and international connections along their course. The landscape is beautiful and mobility around the region compensates the long hours of driving. After all, there is more to Lisbon than just city.

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